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Coronavirus: 12 things to know about the Covid-19 pandemic.

Coronavirus: 12 things to know about the COVID-19 pandemic

Coronavirus: 12 things to know about the Covid-19 pandemic.The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that the coronavirus epidemic is now a pandemic. UN Info presents five things to know about this new coronavirus also called Covid-19.  WHO has expressed concern about the alarming levels of spread and severity of the new coronavirus, but also of inaction. The UN agency responsible for global health expects the number of cases, deaths, and countries affected by Covid-19 to increase.  The current pandemic forces us to stay at home, away from your usual activities and your friends. It may be difficult. To help you understand, our THINGSTOKNOW website answers frequently asked questions about the Covid-19, here are 10 things to know about the COVID-19.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that the coronavirus epidemic is now a pandemic. UN Info presents five things to know about this new coronavirus, also called COVID-19.
WHO has expressed concern about the alarming levels of spread and severity of the new coronavirus, and inaction. The UN agency responsible for global health expects the number of cases, deaths, and countries affected by COVID-19 to increase.
The current pandemic forces us to stay at home, away from your usual activities and your friends. It may be difficult. To help you understand, our THINGSTOKNOW website answers frequently asked questions about the COVID-19, here are 10 things to know about the COVID-19.

1- Complicated names

Coronavirus is a new, highly contagious virus. If someone gets sick from catching it, they are said to have COVID 19. This disease causes fever and difficulty breathing.
COVID-19, which appeared in China at the end of 2019, then quickly spread around the world. This is why we speak of a pandemic. A pandemic is a disease that affects many people in many countries.

2- What is the difference between an epidemic and a pandemic?

Before the announcement made Wednesday, March 11, 2020, by the WHO, the coronavirus had been qualified by the UN agency of epidemic. This means that the disease has spread to many people and many communities at the same time.
Calling the coronavirus epidemic a pandemic means that the disease has officially spread around the world.
The pandemic was announced by Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of WHO, at a press conference in Geneva. "So we felt that COVID-19 could be called a pandemic," he said. "We have never seen a pandemic triggered by a coronavirus." In the past two weeks, the number of cases outside of China has increased 13-fold, and the number of affected countries has tripled, according to WHO.
"Describing the situation as a pandemic does not change the assessment of the threat posed by this coronavirus. It does not change what WHO does, and it does not change what countries should do," he said.

3- Should we now be more worried about the coronavirus?

Calling the COVID-19 epidemic pandemic does not mean that the virus has become more deadly, but it is merely an acknowledgement of its worldwide spread.
WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhananon Ghebreyesus stressed that the qualification of a pandemic does not change the assessment of the threat posed by the virus. "It doesn't change what WHO does, and it doesn't change what countries should do," he said.
Dr. Tedros also called on the world not to focus on the word "pandemic", but rather to focus on five necessary actions: prevention, preparedness, public health, political leadership and aid and attention to people.
The head of the WHO has recognized that the spread of COVID-19 is the first pandemic to be caused by a coronavirus (that is, any wide variety of viruses that cause illnesses ranging from colds to more severe diseases).
However, he also stressed that all countries can still change the course of this pandemic and that it is the first that can be truly controlled.

4- What should countries do?

WHO has reiterated its call to countries to detect, test, treat, isolate, locate, and mobilize their populations, to ensure that those with only a handful of cases can prevent further spread.
Although 118,000 cases have been reported in 114 states, more than 90% of these cases are concentrated in only four countries: China, Italy, South Korea, and Iran.
In two of these countries (China and South Korea), the number of new cases is, in WHO terms, "dropping significantly". 81 countries have not yet reported COVID-19 instances, and in 57 countries, only 10 cases or less has been said.
The new coronavirus remains a concern, however, if many countries do not act quickly enough or take the urgent and aggressive measures that, according to WHO, are necessary.
Even before the pandemic was announced, the WHO advocated that each country adopt an interdepartmental government approach to dealing with the crisis, stressing that every sector, not just the health sector, is affected.
Even countries in which the virus has spread throughout an entire community, or within large population groups, can still reverse the trend of the pandemic, said Dr. Tedros, adding that several countries have shown that the virus could be deleted and controlled.


5- What should I do?

It is understandable to feel anxiety about the coronavirus. However, the WHO points out that if you are not in an area where COVID-19 spreads, or if you have not travelled to an area where the virus spreads, or if you have not been in contact with an infected patient, your risk of infection is low.
However, we all have a responsibility to protect ourselves and others. Here are some key recommendations:
• Wash your hands regularly and thoroughly with soap.
• Keep at least a meter away from anyone who coughs or sneezes
• Avoid physical contact when greeting someone.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Cover your mouth and nose with a bent elbow or a disposable tissue when coughing or sneezing.
• Stay at home and consult a doctor with local health providers if you do not feel well.

Although the virus infects people of all ages, there is evidence that the elderly (60 years and older) and those with underlying health conditions (such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory diseases, and cancer) are more at risk.
People in these categories are advised to take additional measures, including ensuring that all those who come to visit them wash their hands, to keep house surfaces cleaned and disinfected regularly, and to prepare a plan for an epidemic in their community.
WHO and other United Nations agencies have stressed the importance of solidarity and avoiding stigmatizing individuals or groups during this pandemic. "We are in the same boat," said Dr. Tedros on Wednesday, urging everyone to "do the right things calmly and protect the citizens of the world."

6- Older people at higher risk!

Most healthy young people are not likely to be very sick if they get the virus. But the elderly and the poor can have severe symptoms, and even die.
To reduce the likelihood that they will get coronavirus, the government is asking these people to stay at home. They should not be visited either. Fortunately, there are still phones, tablets, and computers to talk to your grandparents!


7- Not sick, but infected

Some people, especially young people, can get coronavirus without feeling sick. They, therefore, risk transmitting it without knowing it.
For this reason, our governments have cancelled sporting and cultural events, in addition to closing schools and several businesses. It protects everyone.
By these measures, we also try to avoid having too many sick people at the same time. If that happened, we could run out of doctors, beds, and hospitals to treat everyone.

8- The situation is taken seriously

Our governments quickly brought the case seriously. They keep us informed every day, and they make difficult but necessary decisions, like closing schools and many businesses.


9- Why are some friends in quarantine?

Because they have travelled to another country or because they have been in contact with someone who arrives recently from a land touched by coronavirus epidemic. So your friends might have brought the coronavirus with them, even if they have no symptoms.
Quarantine is about isolating oneself so as not to catch a disease, or on the contrary, not to contaminate other people if you are sick or carrying a virus.
Isolation lasts 14 days because it is maximum time it takes for this virus to make a person sick. During this time, the virus can be transmitted even if there are no symptoms.


10- How to protect yourself?

Anyone can get coronavirus. It is, therefore, essential to follow government directives. They are crucial to protect yourself and others.
Must, therefore :
• stay at home as much as possible;
• not see friends;
• wash your hands often;
• cough in his elbow;
• and greet people from a distance when you leave the house.
The rules are even stricter after a trip abroad. We then spend two weeks without leaving the house.

11- Good handwashing

Finally, don't forget that the virus is mainly caught when you touch infected surfaces. To protect yourself, you must, therefore, wash your hands:
- very often: almost once every hour.
- very long: at least 20 seconds. Sing Happy Birthday at the same time if it helps you (this song lasts about 20 seconds).
- very good: do not forget to rub between the fingers, the fingertips, around the thumbs, and on the back of the hands.
You only wear a mask if you cough. It serves to protect others. It's not very effective at protecting yourself.

12- Where can I get reliable information?

The best place to obtain reliable information is the WHO website https://www.who.int/en. On this site, you can find comprehensive advice, including how to minimize the risk of spreading or catching the COVID-19.
The site is updated daily, so check it regularly.
It is also advisable to consult the official website of your city, department, region, or ministry of health, which may contain specific health information, as well as updated information about your community, such as advice. Travel and epidemic hotspots.
The WHO warns that several myths and scams are circulating online. People are taking advantage of the spread of the virus to steal money or sensitive information. According to the UN agency, if someone is contacted by a person or organization claiming to belong to the organization, it must take steps to verify its authenticity.
The WHO site includes a section aimed at debunking some unsubstantiated theories that have circulated online. For example, the myth that cold can kill the virus, or that taking a hot bath or eating garlic can prevent infection, or that mosquitoes can spread the virus. There is no evidence for any of these claims.

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